Thursday, February 25, 2010

Your Mama Hears...

...From an informant we'll call Buhneeda Beansouttathebag that the whispers and murmurs that have been circulating and slipping down the real estate grapevine for many months about decorator du jour Kelly Wearstler and her property developer huzband Brad Korzen wanting to sell their recently rehabbed Beverly Hills house are true.

After Buhneeda gave us the deets we immediately got on the horn to another of our Bev Hills real estate insider pals–this one we'll call Candy Canconfirmit–who quickly corroborated Buhneeda's not entirely unexpected scuttlebutt.

Now children, this is where you should probably do what Your Mama did when we first heard about this: Brace yourself with a stiff gin & tonic and a nerve pill because according to Buhneeda, La Wearstler and Mister Korzen have quietly floated the legendary estate on the market with an asking price of somewhere near–are you ready for this lads and lassies?–fifty million dollars. That's right, 50,000,000 biggins.

It seems to Your Mama's pea brain that there's a bit of a trend developing in the recent listing and "listing" of major estates in Lala Land with fifty million dollar asking prices. In the last week alone we saw the Yorkin estate on Delfern Drive get hoisted up at $49,500,000 and, on the very same damn day, recently widowed rich gal Bren Simon heaved her behemoth Bellagio Road beast onto the market with an asking price of exactly $50,000,000. The fifty million dollar fad (allegedly) continues with La Wearstler and Mister Korzen unofficially goosing their big ol' Bev Hills estate on to the market.

Your Mama can't help but wonder if this spreading rash of fifty million dollar listings (and "listings") has something to do with a kind of reflected real estate optimism due to Dreamworks' Jeffrey Katzenberg recently laying out $35,000,000 for his new spread on Loma Vista Drive, just a few blocks away from La Wearstler and Mister Korzen and around the corner from Jennifer Aniston's recently completed Hal Leavitt overhaul on N. Hillcrest Road. It could be. Or it might be that these people have their heads in the financial clouds and need what MadTVs Tovah McQueen and Velma Buttons would call a real estate reality check.

Whatever the case, the estate of La Wearstler and Mister Korzen has a storied past. The Georgian meets Hollywood Regency style house, completed in 1934, was designed by oft over looked architect James Dolena. There are several versions of who owned the property and when, but the following is the one that seems most plausible. The property was once owned by insanely prolific actor and director Hobart Bosworth. In the early 1930s the property was purchased by mustachioed actor William Powell who, at the time, was married to legendary film actress Carole Lombard. The couple commissioned Mister Dolena to build them a significant house commensurate with the vaunted position they held in the Hollywood lexicon. But alas, as is, has always been and will always be on the romantically fickle streets of Tinseltown, their love quickly faded and the couple decamped to the court of dee-vorce in 1933 before the mansion was completed.

At some point–we don't know exactly when but guesstimate it was in the 1950s–the estate was purchased by Albert "Cubby" Broccoli whose claim to Hollywood fame and fortune was his role as the mastermind behind the James Bond film franchise. Cubby produced 17 James Bond movies including Dr. No, Goldfinger, Your Only Live Twice, Live and Let Die, Moonraker, For Your Eyes Only, and Octopussy. Cubby also produced a large number of non-James Bond films, a list that includes Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, The Trials of Oscar Wilde, and the kinda creepy sounding How to Marry a Rich Uncle. The prolific and powerful producer owned the estate for around 40 years until he passed on to meet the big producer in sky in 1996 at the ripe old age of 87. After Cubby's death, according to the folks at the Movieland Directory, the estate was leased for a number of years to actress and architectural fanatic Diane Keaton.

Are y'all keeping with Your Mama?

That brings us up to the mid-2000s when in walks hot hot hot decorator and notorious fashion daredevil Kelly Wearstler and her hotelier/property developer huzband Brad Korzen who were 19 kinds of flush with cheddar from a number of whirlwind years of scorching and seemingly endless success. The mid-2000s were the salad years for design-minded folks like Mister Korzen and La Wearstler. The impressively ambitious pair capitalized on an insatiable market driven by post-mid-century modernist 20- and 30-something year old style mavens armed with pocketfuls of money and who, in response to a decade of mid-century-inspired decorative minimalism, craved a more eclectic lifestyle wrapped in buttery soft leather sofas, golf ball sized cocktail rings, and a lot of 1970s retro-chic chrome things. These were the years that made celebrity stylist Rachel Zoe rich and almost as famous as her clientele who at that time included gossip glossy publicity magnets like toothpick thin Nicole Richie, tabloid train wreck Lindsay Lohan, troubled actress Mischa Barton and hates being famous Keira Knightley.

But we digress. We're not here to speak on Miss Zoe and her wild and wooly fashion ways but the stylist to the star's reference ought to provide the children with some informative background noise that illustrates the time period and social orbit in which La Wearstler and Mister Korzen became so successful they could afford to spend well into 8 figures on the fabled Brocoli estate in Bev Hills.

Mister Korzen, who owns the privately held hotel and property development company The Kor Group, is the man responsible for all the intensely stylized Viceroy hotels located in chic (and "chic") hot spots like Palm Springs, Miami, Santa Monica, Snowmass (CO), and Anguilla. In addition to his hotel ventures, Mister Korzen spearheaded a number of high-profile condo conversions in Los Angeles including the Eastern Columbia in downtown L.A. and The Broadway Hollywood on the famed corner of Sunset and Vine.

La Wearstler, who once bared her boobs as a Playboy playmate of the month, is the ladee decorator responsible for doing up the interiors and lobbies of most if not all of Mister Korzen's projects. Ain't nuthin' like a little mutually symbiotic professional nepotism to ensure the money stays in the family.

Anyhoo, whether y'all love or hate their much ballyhooed and prodigiously publicized projects–and people do seem to either adore or loathe them–La Wearstler and Mister Korzen became–and still are–one of the west coast's most successful power couples in the harsh and often unforgiving worlds of real estate and interior design.

Property records show that La Wearstler and Mister Korzen scooped up the Cubby Brocoli estate in July of 2005 for the not exactly bargain basement price of $25,000,000. Some will scream and shout and snicker and state with self-imbued real estate authority that the dee-ziney duo over-paid for the property by many millions. We don't know about that. Maybe they did, maybe they didn't. Remember puppies, although they were not everyday occurrences, $25,000,000 for a potential fabulous fixer weren't exactly unheard of at that time either.

What we do know–well, okay, we don't know, but we imagine–is that after closing on the property these big livin' bizzy beavers spent years and a major mound of money making updates, upgrades, redos, renovations, and restorations to the 3.91 acre property. Add in the property taxes, which the tax man says are in the neighborhood of $300,000 per year, the upkeep and repair costs, insurance, and mortgage servicing–public records show the Wearstler/Korzen couple carry a titanic mortgage on the property–and Your Mama needs another damn nerve pill just to think about thinking about the size of their monthly nut. We don't, of course, have any idea what their actual monthly nut is, but extrapolating from what's freely available in public property records, Your Mama thinks it's safe to say the high hoggers hemorrhage more moo-lah every single month than most of the children make in an entire damn year.

Current property records show the house measures in at a massive but not overly bloated 11,371 square feet and includes 8 bedrooms and 10 poopers. We are pretty sure that the eleven and some thousand square feet does not include the interior of the rather large pool house, but we don't know if bedroom and pooper count is still accurate. It's entirely possible the couple re-purposed a bedroom, combined 2 into 1, added a pooper or all of the above. We just don't know.
La Wearstler and Mister Korzen have had their house photographed for about 49,000 publications and other things including Hue, La Wearstler's newest, high-lariously serious and seriously camp coffee table tome that celebrates her own passion for her own wildly exuberant taste and style. Therefore, it's not hard to find bazillions of photos of the house both online and in bookstores. Your Mama, thanks to Buhneeda Beansouttathebag, came across a considerable online cache–a virtual tour by one of Los Angeles' busiest real estate listing photographers Everett Fenton Gidley–that presents the property in a most magnificently vivid and mesmerizing manner.

As one glides through the pillared gates, ascends the gently curving drive with the chunky and intricately articulated residence sitting high on a knoll to the right, and swoops into the massive motor court there is nearly no indication of the brazen and brassy extravaganza of saturnalia behind the giddily ornate but still dignified facade. The only hint, perhaps, is the inverted shell motif above the glossy black front doors. However, it only takes passing across the traditional threshold to discover that the interior rooms are done over in Kelly Wearstler's special brand of decorative ka-ray-zee.

Much of the manse appears to retain its original architectural detailing, which La Wearstler has used to great effect as a major player in her luridly dramatic, mixy but rarely matchy, and fearlessly excessive day-core that exudes a kind of shameless confidence few people have–bully for her–and many might find off-putting, even egregious to the nth degree.

La Wearstler has did up and worked the house over in her signature style of funkified, 1970s disco-chic super-abundance. She is hardly the first or only big name decorator of note who pushes the edges of decorative abandon–think Jonathan Adler and Miles Redd–but our Kelly...well, our Kelly goes much further and quite simply ignores and obliterates many and most of the rules and regulations adhered to by less courageous interior designers. She is however, arguably, the one who gets the most pages in the glossy shelter magazines whose editors bow and scrape the bottom of her feet with smoke and praise hoping to catch a few shards of her reflected glory in the form of an agreement to feature one of her many projects.

It does not take a decorating historian–which Your Mama is certainly not–to see that Miz Wearstler has mined–some might even say strip-mined–the iconic and idiosyncratic decorative milieu of iconoclast decorators such as David Hicks, Billy Haines and, most notably, the dee-voon Tony Duquette, the man who pretty much trademarked the more is more style of day-core. In fact, Tony Duquette was so famous for his bawdy and baroque designs that a man named Hutton Wilkinson produced a sumptuous book on Miss Duquette titled, More Is More. We'd bet everything we have that La Wearstler's copy of the book is as worn out and dog-earred as a southern preacher's bible.

Your Mama knows at this point we've likely worn out our welcome with the childrens' attentions so we won't trouble y'all with detailed descriptions of every single aspect, corner, delight and nightmare of La Weastler's abode. We will simply hit on a few of the highlights that we can't seem to shake from our inner eye despite an early morning cocktail meant to soothe our awe and flabbergast.

Let's begin where the house begins, at the entrance foyer. La Wearstler sets the stage here in the petite and sky lit ten-sided room where a faboo custom commissioned glass topped hands table by Mexican born Dadaist artist and furniture maker Pedro Friedeberg sits squarely in the center of the star burst patterned and visually arresting but utterly dignified marble floor. We don't hate it–in fact we l.o.v.e. the table– but it's all so so brazenly madcap and such self-consciously bizarre combination with the inlaid marble floor that it makes Your Mama a wee bit woozy and we've barely taken two steps into the house.

Moving deeper into the bowels of La Wearstler's Bev Hills beast we arrive at an essentially circular space where a sensually curving staircase with spiral iron work was paired with walls painted in an abstract tangle of coral squiggles and swoops in what looks to Your Mama like a not particularly subtle homage to pop artist Keith Haring. All that would be far more than most might be able to endure in their own homes but because this is Kelly Wearstler's house we get more more more starting with a couple of mis-matched chairs–one of which looks like an early version of an electric chair–and a whimsical, bulbous bronze statue of a horse. She then goes even further off the decorative deep end with the staircase where in an already intensely challenging room she slathered the treads in an eye crossing and complex pattern of black and white carpeting. To her credit, La Wearstler manages to take some of the rough edge off the searing and wildly incongruous space with the black and white zebra skin rug laid out on the dark stained hardwood floor that provides just enough continuity and similarity with the carpeting on the stairs that the room stops a heensy-teensy bit shy of causing anyone with a weak decorative stomach to pass out from over-stimulation.

The complex abstract patterning on the walls of the stair hall are repeated with a different but no less aggressive wallpaper treatment on the ceiling of the "formal" living room. La Wearstler has set the random, pick-up-sticks like arrangement of black lines against the white background in a tray surrounded by over-sized dentil molding that together give the room a tension that Your Mama can only describe as not entirely unpleasantly schizophrenic. Most decorators would probably stop there even if they had the balls to go there which almost none to. Not La Wearstler, bee-hawtcha is just getting started up in here where she added a 18th-century crystal chandelier, did the herringbone patterned hardwood floors in a shiny but somber gray, lacquered the walls with an even more somber, almost tomb-like gray, and then she recklessly plopped a massive bronze head on a black and white checkerboard chunk of a coffee table. Finally, like icing on an already heavily frosted cake, she installed a couple of organically shaped and tufted sofas covered in rich blue leather that look like something out of the pool house at Robert Evans' John Woolf designed estate in Beverly Hills, circa 1973.
Nowhere in this huge house is La Wearstler's brave decorative shamelessness and unrestrained obsession with over-blown tableau more evident than in the room that is supposed to be the dining room. The dee-lishusly capacious room has multi-paned windows and French doors on opposing walls and in between a surfboard shaped table surrounded by 12 or 14 three-legged chairs. The table is stacked and cluttered with innumerable objet, busts, statues and statuettes, most of which appear to be body parts: heads, hands, feet, and nekkid torsos with a few horns and plant shapes for variety. It's astonishing, really, and perfectly interesting to look at for a few minutes but, have mercy Kelly hunny, you must have to keep a couple of minimum wage gurls on retainer who can clear that damn table iffin you ever want to use it for something so novel as eating dinner. Remember eating dinner, dearie?

In addition to her compulsion to decorate with the implicit intention to overwhelm and her deep seated need to distort perception through mis-matched proportions, the children will note another of La Wearstler's signature trick o' her stock in trade in the dining room. While La Wearstler has the gutsy color sense of The Madwoman of Chaillot and just about every room in her house looks like a fancy auction house exploded, she typically maintains a rigorous and often monochromatic palette that not only creates an optical juxtaposition between the many (things) and the one (color) but also tends to tone down her playfully riotous and wonderfully whackadoodle day-core.

In the pickled oak den/family room that sits next to and is open to the very glossy stainless steel and brass accented kitchen, La Wearstler went for a darker, more cocaine-friendly environment. We're not saying the ladee does lines in this room or anywhere else for that matter. We do not purport to know a single damn thing about her entertainment proclivities or lack thereof. We're saying that should there actually be a flat surface in the room that is not chock-a-block full of tchotchke, this room looks like the sort place one might be expected to snort a few lines of devil's dust. The burnt orange, black and ecru carpet–which has an ethnic, kente cloth sort of thing going on–provides a complicated base on which to place all that black leather, black lacquer and brass that might otherwise get lost in a room that is almost all black and reflective surfaces that, natch reflect all the black back on itself.
The Wearstler/Korzen boo-dwar is a sexy, paneled affair on the second floor where a cone shaped and amber colored chandelier casts a wickedly cool pattern on the surprisingly plain white ceiling and casts a soft glow over the marital bed dressed with some sort of (possibly faux, possibly real) animal pelt. The deep chocolate hardwood floors are partially covered by a silky looking rug that gives a distinct snake skin vibe. A similar rug covers the floor in the suite's window wrapped sun/sitting room where a couple of curvy swervy pale tan colored leather couches with zebra striped throws casually tossed across the backs are having a Mexican standoff with a (possibly onyx, maybe marble) coffee table in between. This show down of identical davenports has an audience comprised of couple of massive but severely gaunt busts that lord over the room's corners and two, gilded bergere chairs upholstered in black leather judge the decorative death match. Because La Wearstler is a lot like the Winchester Mystery House ladee and just does not know–or care–to stop, she's had a very 1970s black and white rainbow pattern put on the few portions of the walls that are not windows. This patten not only plays with the zebra throws and the snake skin-y rug it obviates any need for costly artwork that no one besides the family and domestic staff will ever see or be suitably impressed by.

We read with relief in a recent article in Vogue magazine written by the extraordinary Hamish Bowles that La Wearstler and Mister Korzen opted to preserve what he called "the elegant Art Moderne bathrooms with their spindly pilasters and exotic marbles, and the dainty Directoire and Carolean paneling that Dolena installed." Your Mama has no idea what "Directoire" or "Carolean" paneling is, but we're thrilled they chose to keep these things as well as all the dizzying and visually combative marble because the bathrooms–while definitely not a place we'd feel very comfortable doing our dirty bizness nor rooms in which a naked body would look anything but freaky–are examples of exquisite little jewel boxes that perfectly depict how a good thing (the unusually veined and colored marble) can become deranged in the most wonderful and brilliant manner in the deft hands of an architect like James Dolena.
The lavishly landscaped and meticulously maintained grounds include boxwood gardens, rolling lawns, a myriad of terraces, fountains, massive, mature and well-laced trees, a few out buildings of unknown uses, a well groomed and lighted tennis court, and a lavishly long, rectangular swimming pool with a protruding half circle of shallow water, and an adjacent pool house that looks to Your Mama like it's larger than the average American home. But let's be honest chickens, do we really think that La Wearstler actually sweats or gets wet? What happens to a vintage Balmain bikini when it gets dunked in chlorinated or salted water? Nothing, because you don't wear a vintage Balmain bikini into the swimming pool.

Listen chickens, we know this house is about as far from a Calabasas tract mansion as it gets and the demanding day-core could very easily swallow up a person without the towering gumption and deep inner-strength of a person like La Wearstler. However, before you go pointing the ugly stick at the house, Your Mama asks that you have a good, long and hard look at it. We're not saying we'd want to live in a menagerie of mostly useless things and lord knows we wouldn't and couldn't come within 3 feet of those upsetting five-legged goose chairs in the library/office/whatever room with the arching bay window. However, we can appreciate and, yes, we respect its unapologetically garish audacity and we have no trouble finding a number of very appealing and interesting decorative moments throughout the house and even some real pearls here and there. Only time will tell if La Wearstler's knee deep in decorative debauchery style of day-core will endure and say what y'all will–and y'all will say–but people, look at the chandeliers. If nothing else, look at the chandeliers. Gurl knows a good damn chandelier when she sees one.

And, of course, do keep in mind that unless a buyer negotiates for it, La Wearstler's demonically profligate day-core will all be removed at the time of a sale, which will leave a perfectly elegant if not quite so quirky house that the new owner can do up in his or her own version of fifty million dollar mansion that will not likely have the joi de vivre and in your face personality of La Wearstler's day-core. It's like art, kids. You're not meant to like everything but if it gets your attention and gets you talking and makes you feel something–desire, revulsion, envy, hatred, anything–then it's done at least part of its job.

Now children, if any of you have reached this point, Your Mama wants to remind y'all that the alleged off-market listing of La Wearstler and Mister Korzen's Bev Hills estate is still, at this point, just rumor and gossip. Rumor and gossip that has landed in Your Mama's laps from two well-connected sources, but rumor and gossip none the less. Even more of a mystery, of course, is the actual asking price. We heard $50,000,000–and in our gut we do think it's fifty million–but that does not mean it is fifty million. We won't know that until we hear from La Wearstler on the matter and coax the actual number–and a private tour–out of her.

listing images (from February 2010): Everett Fenton Gidley for Westside Estate Agency

53 comments:

Regina Joi said...

I have always wondered what WILLIAM POWELLS home by the famed and esteemed James Dolena would look like inside...THANK GOD for little miracles that the ORIGINAL architecture and interiors are still intact.

I HAVE never understood the fascination for the decor of Ms. Wearstler...will it stand the test of time? That is the question WE must all ponder!

I am glad that you have been the one to let loose and let it all hang out on this episode of STRIP-MINING.

Perhaps a Dramamine is needed...

I hope that SOMEONE will come along and rescue this RICH and HISTORICAL property from its' sad overdose of Non-hippie de luxe...Beverly Hills has NEVER got on with saving any of its history, perhaps this will begin the wake up call!!!!

Regina Joi said...

Oh and by the way...it is Karelian Birch that is the wood in the Master Bath, it is from Russia and a rare wood last used in the Biedermier days La Russie! VERY RARE!!!

Anonymous said...

Of course if you put an absurd price on the place to begin with you can cut cut cut all the more and maybe dupe people into thinking they are getting a "bargain." PS The only times when I wish the recent financial downturn had been even worse are when I read about these kind of people, and hope against hope that it might submerge them too.

Anonymous said...

Love the exterior, love the grounds, love the hidden architectual details, hate her decor choices.

Calico Kitty said...

This isn't my style,but this house is beautiful. I could spend a week in there just staring and looking at everything. I love it

Madam Pince said...

I'm not a fan of Hollywood Regency or Kelly Wearstler -- she's insufferably arrogant -- and I'm not the least bit surprised she thinks her house is worth $50 mil. Methinks, though, she and Patty Kluge will be having a talk about real estate reality quite soon.

Anonymous said...

William Powell and Carole Lombard are turning over in their final resting places looking at this trainwreck.

Georgica Pond said...

Thanks, Mama. I'm absolutely exhausted after that, and you must be as well. The next time we go touring through Kelly's BOWELS remind me to wear more sensible shoes.

final presentation said...

troooly your best work, and too-short by half!

Laurel Canyon said...

I took a peek at that juicy Everett Fenton Gridley site and was enthralled by the Frank Lloyd Wright until I saw the unforgivable - there was the photographer in the bathroom mirror!
Now, everybody knows the first two things we learn when we get off the Greyhound on Cahuenga is number one, do not look at the camera when doing porn and number two, the photographer (an any other human person) is NOT to be in a property sales photo!

Anonymous said...

Mama, congratulations. This is surely your magnum opus.

Anonymous said...

Hmm...Pretty on the outside, Ugly on the inside.... The house I mean! It's like Graceland re-imagined by Donatella Versace (on crack) circa 1987. The interiors scream "LOOK @ ALL MY STUFF!!!!!!! Don't you just WANT IT??" Congratulations on all the exotic woods and rare marbles- maybe the next owner will donate them to the Smithsonian so that your future grandkids will be able to imagine what used to exist! I was gonna ask 'Who wants to live in a tomb filled with stuff?' but then again we already know the answer to that one! In any case to each her own. I'm sure KW couldn't live in my house either.

Babe "needs a smoke" Parish said...

Mama,
This is the absolute tops in real estate porn IMHO.

Grazi,
:)))

Love,
Babe

rerun said...

oh mama! while i didn't have my trusty gin and tonic by my side (i'm making do with vodka & tonic), this was MAGNIFICENT. i'm spent. brava!

StPaulSnowman said...

These interiors would truly gag a maggot. Unstable color combinations.....frenetic patterns. The look of this design scheme makes me truly happy to be a fudd!

Anonymous said...

Epic. Juicy.

Don't love Wearster's work and there's something not quite right about her to me, BUT I get it. It's really quite fun to look at. And if it inspires such venom with this many people, well then you know its good even if you don't think it's good.

It's good enough to make her rich and famous and have millions of people talking bout her. She's doing something right.

Anonymous said...

Absolutely superb writing. Thank you.

Anonymous said...

Madam P I know Kelly Wearstler and she's the opposite of arrogant - in fact quite sweet and thoughtful and a generous house guest.

Anonymous said...

Does anyone have the proper link to get the whole house tour?

Excellent house and great reads this week, keep up the good work!

Anonymous said...

Excellent piece and I’m amazed by your grasp and knowledge of interior decorating…

Kelly Wearstler style to me announces her unrestricted homage to phantasmagorical sense of imbued levity. It is not made for everyone to like, and for those that do; the efficacy of the juxtapositions and contrasts bustle with life … a life that task ones apprehension of overabundance.


Keep it coming and I enjoyed it.

Candi Speling said...

Damn, Mama. After this marathon session I needed a cigarette. But it is a wonderful post.

Anonymous said...

OMG WTF! Is everyone out in Crazyland afraid to tell this woman she has no taste? The interior makes me nervous just lookin at it! Maybe she needs to stop tryin so hard

Candi Speling said...

Was it good for you?

Mother Barry said...

A gorgeous property but I think even Lady Gaga would think it's a bit much on the decor. I think Ms Wearstler is fantastic and successful but my grandmamma always told me, "Honey, get dressed and take one thing off. Don't over do it or you look cheap even in the real stuff." Maybe Kelly could take a note.

EJ said...

Let's look at the reality: 25m in 2005. The housing market crashes in 2007. In 2010 the high end of the housing market still has a ways to go before it settles near the bottom. People don't buy homes for the interior design Ms. Wearstler. Regardless of what you put into the house, to suit your own tastes, you will be LUCKY to get 30 m for it, if that. You overpaid for it to be begin with.

Anonymous said...

What is up the children's backsides this time? Often times the word celebrity brings us estates like Kevin Federline's or all of the senseless drivel that the country western crowd provides. Rarely do I enjoy 25 comments on those sad, sad estates. So many times my poor eyes are assaulted with beige and beige. Apparently most readers must be satisfied with that kind of decor. I for one applaud Ms. Wearstler's vision of what is new and now. Remember that the scale of these rooms are enormous and need some sort of visual punch. At least she didn't pull up to Design Within Reach and load up on some modern "classics" or run to Europe and get some Louis the whatever. We already have tons of examples of both. I find her sense of style refreshing. We need more individuals and less lemmings. I feel like the children would be more satisfied is she had sponge painted the wall in a tuscan style.......barf.

StPaulSnowman said...

Well, I lost my bet with myself. I was certain at least one of the lemming siblings would have commented on the pompom topiary flanking the grand entrance. It really sets the tone for all the fun, refreshing and now interiors once you get inside.

Unge said...

oh my! My Mama is keeping it RE-AL!
ps. there are many types of ugly in the world. we don't need to replace one type with another and say its good because its not as ugly as the other ugly. maybe they are ugly in different ways, but nonetheless still ugly. oh and just because something provokes love or hatred doesn't mean its good also. In that case Hitler would be considered an amazing person. Also if you make a lot of money and are successful doesn't mean you are doing something right. Look at all the wall street execs who floated to safety after the collapse with their golden parachutes. The way our world defines success may not always be what is actually good and right in this world.

Anonymous said...

fair enough unge, but if this is just another kind of ugly, what interior designers working now do you like?

Anonymous said...

OMG, I would absolutely barf everytime I had to walk through any of these rooms--this might quite possibly be the grossest interior Mama has posted so far. Please don't tell me people really pay this Kelly Wearstler money to "design" their homes!!!???

Anonymous said...

interior decorator: a highly paid individual who has the inate shrewdness to fool extremely wealthy and gullible people into believing there is insight, genius, and skill when describing the color black as either "onyx","obsidian" or "midnight".

Anonymous said...

Oh please. All you naysayers. Nothing but throwing shade on this Wearstler chick but not one of you offers up your own idea or version of a decorator doing good stuff.

my guess is you're all a bunch of mario buatta chintz queens who can't stand anything that doesn't look like it came out of grandmas house. either that you you actually like those "neutral" messes in all the faux tuscan terrors that dot the american suburbs

final presentation said...

In defense of Unge (full disclosure: we are real-life homosexual lovers), when you're fluent in the work of the great designers - as Your Mama clearly is - Mongiardino, Hicks, Ruhlmann, Albini, Mollino, Rudolph, et. al., it's hard to get behind a magpie like Wearstler. However successful she may be, the contents of these interiors look like so many items at JF Chen Loft waiting to be bought and carted off to more sympathetic surroundings.

Surely there is money in the States to support the work of great, living masters such as Jacques Grange, Gae Aulenti, or Luigi Caccia Dominioni (or why not commission genuinely cool kids like Maarten Baas or Konstantin Grcic to design your powder room?). Instead, status-seeking high rollers make do with this sort of secondhand, "madcap" and "irreverent" work. I, for one, don't really mind this Vegas-y phase of Wearstler's, but it's doubtful that she will ever develop a wholly original, authentic vocabulary (I mean, even someone like John Saladino is nothing if not true to a singular but evolving vision). Wearstler's a marketing genius, not a designer, and she knows what she's doing.

Anonymous said...

with all due respect, but aren't konstantin, baas and dominio aren't reall "decorators" though are they? i'm not sassing i'm just not aware of any of there interiors.

and saladino IS great but what if you don't want something so traditional?

i think steven sclaroff if good too a bit wacky with the trad. but...

i'm not saying wearstler is the end all be all and i do think that you're right in that she's a marketer and does not truly have her own voice (few do really), but someone who is not a decorator can not do what she does and what she does is create over the top environments. she's more a set decorator sort of designer in the tradition of duquette. shes NOT duquette, but that's what she's doing.

Svetlana Scatopova said...

Can anyone name a truly great straight interior designer..........other than Martha Stewart. My bruising is almost gone!

Regina Joi said...

What does straight or gay have to do with the INTERIOR DESIGN of a home...why disgrace an ARTFORM with that silly question, must it always come back to what goes on behind closed doors?

This fine Hollywood Regency home was designed by a MASTER architect, was most likely filled with T.H.ROBSJOHN-GIBBONS pieces like the famed 'Casa Encantada' by the same architect and afore mentioned interior designer - IT shows how much homework IS NEEDED when one is holding precious history in the palm of their hand...homage to the past and a vision of now is the recipe to a GREAT AND TIMELESS stage for lives to be lived in.

What is wrong with Jean Michel Frank, a Ming altar table or two, a few Eugene Berman and Salvador Dali Paintings, a Louis XVI gilt settee upholstered in Tiger Velvet and Billy Haines swivel Seniah chairs with Hostess Elbow chairs... add some Cecil Beaton photographs blown up, or better yet, Polidori photos of Versailles.

Chintz CAN be used in restrained colors and patterns, I've seen it! What is wrong with just using a wonderful plain white PAINT in the stairway hall considering that the IRONWORK is divine and speaks for itself. I do not think the idea of that present pattern is bad, but not in the whole of THAT room, the jarring clash is just too too for the eyes and the INITIATED to accept, perhaps this was an experiment for a new Wallpaper design, but shrink it for ONE wall ala Twombly in a Dressing room or better yet, the powder room!

What is wrong with others who critique the obvious? I am all for design genius, but let us remember that 'too much is not a good thing', and that is FIRST RULE!

I am proud that she has taken on young Hollywood and is giving shape to those that do not know, I know of one commission that is using a Master Ceramicist, but lets give credit where credit is due...to the shop owners who ALL create and sell those inspiring interiors that so MANY decorators pillage off of, and to those who have passed into the Great School of Interior Design Heaven that have left us what was wrought by master hands and designs...Ruhlmann, Lalanne, Nakashima, and Eileen Gray.

Mixing in the Modernists with the Louis XIV-XVI IS THE acquired taste of the knowing ~ Billy Haines, Paul Lazlo and even Tony Duquette did so, all varying from restrained minimalism to-over-the top cuckoo...but it worked. In this case, it does not!

Open your mind, veer off of the path, light the lantern...and GROW!
I still remember when she was just off of Beverly in a little house by an alley with a tiny-teeny garden of crushed glass and little cafe table for 2.

She has come far and will go further, but please do not forgot those that have gone before and the classic recipe of success- CELEBRATE ALL DESIGN WITH A MODICUM OF RESTRAINT AND ELEGANCE.

Anonymous said...

Don't. Do. Acid. In. This. House.

StPaulSnowman said...

Regina Joi; I enjoyed your comments, but remember..... the first rule of Design Club..........don't talk about Design Club............

Anonymous said...

Where's Tony Montana?

Anonymous said...

Sorry; I've never thought she had any talent as a decorator. Just derivative. And cold.

gih said...

This is my ideal house. So expensive, yet the best place for rest.

Anonymous said...

http://www.hillcrestestate.com/

Anonymous said...

Absolutely hideous decor.

Regina Joi said...

DESIGN CLUB APPLICATION:

FORMER ANTIQUES DEALER

RESTORER OF SEVERAL HOMES AND GARDENS

HOMES PHOTOGRAPHED BY FABLED ARCHITECTURAL PHOTOGRAPHERS

HOMES PUBLISHED IN SEVERAL BOOKS AND MAGAZINES

***********************************
BOARD MEMBERS ONLY:

These above-mentioned 'Feathers in Cap', DO allow this person to speak on the Design Club.

Allow once in a while, for the above candidate is a confirmed Recluse or Loose Wreck as Doris Duke once quoted.

***********************************
NOTE

Several years ago, GARY WINNICK paid $96 million for CASA ENCANTADA...HILLCREST is at least half of that, perhaps more than half...this is the ONLY way to preserve this fabulous piece of architectural history in Beverly Hills/Hollywood historical chapter from a billionaire who is from another country that does not respect OUR history here in Southern California...a few jingles in the pocket DOES NOT give license to destroy our history of Architecture as so much has gone the sad way of demolition for the anothers skewed vision of what 'ARRIVISTE' means!

Carla Ridge said...

Tiaras off to Mama! One of my favorite Real Estalker posts of all time. The Proustian command of detail, nuance -- combined with the ability to navigate the history and day-kor without toppling into the hedges -- just leave this reader bowed and breathless. This story was the lips of everyone I spoke to this weekend -- every one who's anyone, that is, LOL.

PS: the comments by Final Presentation and Regina Joi get my penultimate compliment: I have nothing left to add to your excellent insights. Bravo! Brava!

Anonymous said...

Great read Mama. As for the decor, I love it.

Just about every week Mama posts some mansion where every square inch is done in various shades of beige in a hideous permutation of a faux Tuscan villa. And the in the comments page, all the children complain, complain, complain how boring it is, no imagination, how blah, etc.

Well here's one that isn't beige and you guys are still bitching. Obviously not for everyone, but wow, for me its a wonderfully done house inside and out.

Anonymous said...

The emperor has no clothes, right? Her designs are ghastly and vertigo-inducing. Of course, it's her own home and we should all decorate our houses in any way that pleases us. But why anyone pays her to design is a mystery.
Enjoyed your article, Mama you witty thing, as usual.

Clara Bow said...

I love that pool house!

Anonymous said...

After Mr. Broccoli passed away in 1996, Mrs. Broccoli stayed in the house until she passed away in 2004. The children kept the house until Kelly bought it in 2005. Not sure where you got the idea that it was being leased??

Anonymous said...

Dramamine is not strong enough. I could not relax in that house without a couple of Xanax, and Martini. I appreciate the Architecture, and someone, does indeed need to save this. If I bought it, I would need to completely redo it.

Would love to see the original interiors of this home. I adore the exterior.

While she can be fun, Kelly does not know when to stop. Perhaps Kelly and Master Poser/Supreme Copier Jonathan Adler, are buying their own story. I am not. Maybe there is some work in Vegas for them.

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