Thursday, March 6, 2014

Floor Plan Porn: Edgar Bronfman, Sr.

SELLER: heirs of Edgar M. Bronfman, Sr.
PLACE: New York City, NY
PRICE: $65,000,000
SIZE: 5 bedrooms, 5 full and 2 half bathrooms plus 4 staff bedrooms that share two bathrooms)

YOUR MAMAS NOTES: Just as just about every property gossip with even a pinky toe in the New York City real estate waters had heard word, the sprawling simplex penthouse at 960 Fifth Avenue, owned for nearly 40 years by billionaire booze baron, international businessman and noted philanthropist Edgar M. Bronfman, has popped on the open market with a global publicity ensuring—and probably not entirely unrealistic—asking price of $65,000,000.*

That the much coveted, mini-mansion sized penthouse—Your Mama unscientifically calculated the interior square footage to be around 6,200—was not sold off market is what is most surprises to Your Mama. Iffin we were the betting type—and we're not—we'd have wagered both our long-bodied bitches, Linda and Beverly, and our mean ol' pussy, Sugar, there would have been a long line of hedge fund fat cats and other sick-rich international captains of industry who would have quickly and quietly snatched this sucker up in an off market deal in—well—a New York minute. But, alas. and anyways...

As of this morning digital listings we have access to do not include interior photographs. They do, lucky us, include a mouth watering floor plan that indicates there are 4-5 family bedrooms and five full and two half bathrooms. A duplexed staff wing behind the kitchen provides four cell-sized bedrooms and two shared bathrooms on a lower level and an upper level staff lounge that, sadly for the live-in staff, does double duty as the penthouse's laundry room. We also counted two wrap around terraces—one that has panoramic views up and down Fifth Avenue and across Central Park, five fireplaces, nine walk-in closets—ten if you count the walk-in safe, and more than 45 windows and French doors that all by themselves probably require a year-round part-time minimum wage worker to keep streak and grime free.

A private elevator landing opens to a slightly off-center foyer. The children will note the spacious, perfectly positioned powder room suite provides supreme pooper privacy, generous ventilation, and plenty of toiletry and linen storage in a pair of closets. Double doors open from the foyer into a capacious, 650-ish square foot living room with direct park views and terrace access through three sets of French doors. The adjacent, 500-ish square foot formal dining room also has terrace access and a direct view of Central Park as does the cozier-scaled library, located right off the foyer next door to the living room. An efficiently arranged kitchen and service wing includes a breakfast room, butler's pantry, roomy center island kitchen (with service entrance), and the aforementioned duplexed staff quarters.

A long, zig-zagged corridor extends east from the foyer—Your Mama estimates based on measurements shown on the floor plan it's nearly 80 feet long all together—and links the penthouse's public spaces to the south-facing bedroom wing where there are four roomy but hardly huge guest/family bedrooms, each with walk-in closet and private windowed bathroom.

The master suite, at the far, eastern end of the J-shaped apartment has an elegant entry vestibule, a corner bedroom with fireplace, two walk-in closets—one cedar lined, and a windowed bathroom with separate cubicle for the crapper and bidet. Although it does not appear to be directly accessible from the master bedroom, the floor plan shows a long and slender fitted dressing room with attached half bathroom that opens off the corridor.

960 Fifth Avenue, a 15-floor limestone-faced grande dame on the super-plum, northeast corner of Fifth Avenue and East 77th Street directly across from Central Park—was completed in the late 1920s and designed by vaunted architect Rosario Candela in association with Warren and Wetmore, the firm responsible for New York's spectacular Grand Central Terminal and the also stunning, Art Deco Helmsley Building that, literally, straddles Park Avenue between East 45th and East 46th Streets. There are certainly more expensive buildings in New York—take for example the ungodly expensive condo-complex 15 Central Park West—and (arguably) even more rarefied and restricted cooperative apartment houses—say, 820 Fifth Avenue or, maybe, 4 East 66th Street—but 960 Fifth Avenue is unquestionably one of Manhattan's finer addresses and quietly if confidently oozes limitless wealth and high-nosed status.

Not surprisingly, residents of 960 Fifth Avenue pay astronomical monthly cooperative fees. The common charges on Mister Bronfman Sr.'s penthouse are shown on current listings $19,093 per month. In addition to all the standard white glove services common to Fifth Avenue apartment houses—doormen, porters, elevator operators, etc—960 offers residence catered lunch and dining services through the Georgian Suite, a lavish private dining and entertainment space on the building's ground floor.

We don't profess to know the full provenance of the penthouse but we do know that before Mister Bronfman acquired it some forty years ago it was owned by a proudly portly woman named Particia Harmsworth, a.k.a. Viscountesse Rothermere, a British B-movie actress turned effervescently flamboyant and internationally beloved bon vivant who was more commonly known amongst the globe's jet setting elite as Bubbles. Bubbles, the widow of billionaire newspaperman Vere Rothermere, died of an accidental drug overdose during the summer of 1992 in a villa on the French Riviera that had once belonged to Greta Garbo.

Previous residents of the limestone edifice at 960 Fifth Avenue—also addressed 3 East 77th Street—include well-bred Brit Claus von Bülow, who owned a 16-room simplex on the 8th floor and sold it in the mid 1980s after he was acquitted of the murder of his wife, Sunny. Philanthropist Patricia Altschul unloaded her Maria Buatta-decorated one bedroom maisonette apartment—once the home of universally venerated upper class interior decorator Sister Parish—in Mach 2013 for $2,932,500 to a couple from Houston, TX.

In early February (2014) Cuban-born sugar baron José "Pepe" Fanjul paid $1.9 million in an off-market deal for a small apartment on a low floor and in July 2013 low-profile Peruvian billionaire financier Carlos Rodriguez-Pastor shelled out $21 million for a high floor duplex. The seller was Toy "R" Us founder Charles Lazarus.

Our research and resources indicate additional current owners include Latin American media baron Gustavo Cisneros, powerful socialite Anne Bass, former Goldman Sachs honcho Roy Zuckerberg, Brazilian steel magnate Benjamin Steinbruch—he paid $18.875 million for his mid-floor duplex in late 2010, and well-married socialite Emily "Pemmy" du Pont Frick who moved to 960 Fifth Avenue not long after she and her late second husband, American aristocrat Dr. Henry Clay Frick II, sold their 63-acre Alpine, NJ estate for an astronomical $58,000,000.

Textile tycoon Loic De Kertanguy and his gal about town wife, Rebecca, coughed up $6,825,000 in August 2011 for their six-room residence, which they bought from the estate of thoroughbred breeder Edward P. Evans. Interestingly enough, Mister and Missus De Kertanguy already owned at south facing apartment on the 12th floor with two terraces at 960 Fifth Avenue that they sold concurrently in August 2011 for $4.6 million to none other than Charles Lazarus.

*Although news of the $65 million penthouse listing has made its way through a number of property gossip columns today, Your Mama actually first heard it first thing this morning via a couple of separate but equal digital missives thoughtfully sent by The Rabbi and Hot Chocolate. Presumably Mister Bronfman shared the penthouse with his fourth wife, artist Jan Aronson.

floor plan: Brown Harris Stevens

55 comments:

lil' gay boy said...

The ne plus ultra of any Fifth Avenue manse -- a window in every bathroom. This storied apartment will not last long, and I would not be at all surprised if it actually garnered more than asking.

"...an upper level staff lounge that, sadly for the live-in staff, does double duty as the penthouse's laundry room. " As an experienced goldbricker, I'd say this is actually a plus; "Tell madame I'm doing the wash; 1800 thread count sheets need constant care..."

;-)

If walls could talk...

Anyone interested in the rags to riches (and back again -- almost) story of the Bronfmans,from Prohibition to the Vivendi debacle, should take a gander at The Bronfmans: The Rise and Fall of the House of Seagram
.

I would love to hear our dear Rebbe's take on the layout; I'm guessing there are no problems with the feng shui.

Anonymous said...

one could die of starvation in the middle of the night, if you decided to go to the kitchen from the master bedroom... a very long walk indeed.

my biggest bitch with this floor plan is that the master bathroom only has one vanity sink!

for $65 million, I would expect a much more luxurious master bath

Anonymous said...

Hmmm....pretty similar to the 740 penthouse he occupied before moving here!

Anonymous said...

Confidential exclusively to LGB:

The absent northeast, or feng shui soul development corner of the 960 Fifth Avenue penthouse did not retard the spiritual growth of Mr. Edgar M. Bronfman Sr., z"l. Upon the June 26, 2013 Supreme Court validation of gay marriage, Mr. Bronfman Sr. reminisced for the Jewish Telegraphic Agency: During the early 1970s, Seagrams human resource director advised Mr. Bronfman Sr. to fire a young gay executive. Mr. Bronfman Sr. retained the gay employee and terminated the personnel director for discrimination. Mr. Bronfman concluded he "viewed marriage equality as a moral imperative due to his Jewish roots."

Rabbi Hedda LaCasa

Rick Wrinklebottom said...

A fine example of a Candela penthouse if ever there was one, but...I, like Mama, am also a bit (more than a bit?) shocked to see a trophy penthouse in one of Fifth's "good" buildings listed publicly like a common condo (and yes, dears, even 15 Central Park West is a common condo compared to a building like 960 Fifth...at least to the kind of people who can get past the board in a building of its ilk), so it makes me wonder - were there no takers that could pass the board's muster when this was (undoubtedly) just a whisper listing? Is this a sign that, much like fellow "good" building River House seems to have done recently, the residents of 960 Fifth, jealous from seeing condo prices skyrocket while co-op prices (even eight-figure ones) have stagnated, have finally deigned to hold their collective noses and allow anyone (or, at least, almost anyone) who can pay the freight entry into their hallowed building? Are they ready to let a Russian plutocrat or an Asian tycoon dine in the rarefied air of 960's famous private dining room?

We shall see...

LA Ad Guy said...

Mama, as obsessed as we all are about dear departed Hugette, I'm suprised you didn't mention that this is the very corner where Senator Clark built his monstrous over-the-top mansion back in the day which was torn down for this fine co-op. And I agree about the mystery why it didn't sell off market, maybe it needs lots of work/updates hence the lack of interior pics. Time will tell...

JGV said...

Almost flawless.

I would make a few changes:
- Incorporate kitchen, pantry and breakfast room into one large kitchen & informal dining area (see Laurie Tisch's 834 5th aerie).
- Convert the most westernly bedroom into an informal living room (I don't want to watch TV in a 650 sqft living room, library or bedroom, and yes I do want to watch TV sometimes), and make a wet-bar out of the bathroom.
- More clearly separate the two easternly bedrooms (i assume they are currently in use as his and hers) and update the master bathroom.



LA Ad Guy said...

P.S. LOVED the link to the story about previous resident Bubbles, she was quite the outlandish character who lived a full and crazy life thanks to hubby's billions, any idea where the LA house was?

Anonymous said...

Beautiful floorplan, but the real gem at 960 was the massive 1 bedroom duplex of dr Preston pope satterwhite, which was diced up like a tomato and resold.

Anonymous said...

Bubbles apparently had a low slung house somewhere up on Summitridge. Not as fun as her other houses.

lil' gay boy said...

Dearest Rebbe,

Thanks for the anecdote -- I vaguely recall hearing this recently. Always thought that the family's origins kept them (for the most part) rooted in reality (despite some boneheaded business moves). "Bronfman’s daughter Phyllis Lambert was twenty-seven years old when she took over the search for an architect and chose Mies van der Rohe, a pioneering modern master of what he termed “skin and bones” architecture. Mies, who designed the elegant, deceptively simple thirty-eight-story tower along with Philip Johnson, emphasized the beauty of structure and fine materials, and set the building back from the avenue, creating an urban oasis with the building’s plaza".

Señor Wrinklebottom,

Money talks, bullshit walks, no?

LA Ad Guy,

"...the very corner where Senator Clark built his monstrous over-the-top mansion back in the day..." Considered out of fashion & vulgar at the time, can you imagine if it had indeed survived? It probably would have been as much of a standout out as the controversial Guggenheim is, a dozen or so blocks to the north...

WrteStufLA said...

When built, the 9th (full)and 10th (partial) floors contained what was likely the grandest duplex apartment of the time. It included a baronial 2-story drawing room, and cost $450,000 -- an astronomical sum at the time. Alas, after the original owner died during the depths of the Great Depression, the apartment was carved into multiple units.

Anonymous said...

The Bronfman news broke a month ago by WSJ. Rabbi, your big scoop is old news.

lil' gay boy said...

Confidential to troll 9:39

Learn to read; news broke 9 months ago, as our dear Rebbe stated:

Jewish Telegraphic Agency: 6/26/13

How about you grow the eff up?
I may be opinionated, boring & frequently wrong, but I feel confident in saying I'm not the only one who is just too, too tired of you. Enough.

Anonymous said...

Thank you LGB

Anonymous said...

Back when I mentioned this to you a few weeks ago, you paid no attention. WSJ wrote about it back then. Awfully late of you...

Anonymous said...

Why is it flawless?

Why is the loo windows so important?

What is an A-grade floor plan design?

Anonymous said...

Some of you people need to relax. When this came up a month or more ago in the WSJ or wherever it was there was no publicly available listing or floor plan.

Anonymous said...

I bet bubbles threw some great parties up in that biatch

Sandpiper said...

The cat and mouse thing up there is childish. Chill out -- everybody.

My floor plan two-cents has to do with the wall separating the living room and dining room. Wouldn't a pair of impressive doors on center have been impactful?!

Complicated family. Yikes.

Anonymous said...

@ Sandpiper,

This is a super-old school plantation house in the sky. Think Gone With the The Wind meets Noo Yawk City.

The separate hallway adjacent to the Living Room is so that the staff can travel back and forth between the compartmentalized pantry, kitchen, and servants quarters without disturbing the owners and their guests in the Living and Dining Rooms. This is how the 0.0001% live.

Sandpiper said...

8:30, You tickle me.

Gee, thanks for the Downton Abby primer. I caught that episode too. I'm more concerned about who gets the larger servant's sleeping room, Mr. Carson or Mrs. Hughes.

Congrats, though, on taking a stab at the whole staff traversing thing. Isn't Google the bestest?

Who knew a fleeting fancy on the beauty of double doors could be such fun.

Anonymous said...

So everybody praises the loo windows and has no idea why? Whoops.

Such an ugly building. An example of 'Stalinist' Manhattan architecture – Italian Renaissance palazzi stretched vertically to create monstrous hideous towers. A sort of Lomonosov University-style building for living.

I would've preferred if the William A. Clark mansion stood in its place. Over-the-top and too flowery in its decoration, but imagine what a temple to that era it could be.

lil' gay boy said...

Anon 12:16,

For anyone who has ever spent time (any time at all), in a New York apartment (any New York apartment), the importance of having a window in the bathroom is twofold (at least):

1) Whether as a guest or resident, we all have experienced a time when "doin' yer bizness" results in a certain, umm, odoriferous situation; being able to open the window for a quick airing will not be lost on anyone (especially if you've every followed such an offender into the facilities and wondered, "Christ, did a cow shit in here?" Even a ceiling fan with a jet engine cannot cope in a windowless crapper.

2) If one partakes of tobacco (or other weeds), being able to pop into a windowed powder room for a quick smoke out the open window (notably at a large, boring party) is infinitely more preferrable to constantly taking elevator trips down to the lobby & out on to the street (especially in inclement weather). Let the doorman count someone else's comings-and-goings to assuage his ennui.

3) View? Not so much.

Candela's vertical palazzo stylings are not to everyone's taste; much like the Baroque styling of the Clark mansion decades earlier. I like to think of them as cyclical, until such time has passed that they become venerable.

The problem with Clark's mansion at the time was that the Senator insisted on excess in everything; the finest stone (he bought the quarry to ensure a steady supply); a French architect (unlicensed in America-- the domestic architect of record had to interpret the French plans). The plans were altered at least once to accommodate the new-fangled horseless carriage; the interiors were quite elaborate & complicated to construct.

The mansion took 11 years to construct, spanning the end of the 19th & beginning of the 20th century, when styles and tastes were changing rapidly, resulting in an outdated composition by the time it was completed,

Nevertheless, I cannot help thinking that in today's market its painstaking construction and fin-de-siecle stylistic sensibilities would lend it a weird charm, and an undeniably impressive presence on the Avenue.

I would like to have seen that.

CockHound2009 said...

That, Momma, is officially the filthiest floor plan porn EVER. It's the floor plan equivalent of watching David Beckham service then entire rest of Real Madrid with the help of Christiano Ronaldo.

Anonymous said...

Lil,
About your parenthetical in item 2, Loveable Jack (Nicholson) pulled off a vapor "cigarette" pen at a recent Hamptons party. Petty guest speculation aside, he finessed it. The window works but always an off chance of blow back. Awkward.

s

Sandpiper said...

1:46. One author I skip -- unless tricked when it poses as anon or plethora of aliases.

Mama's does many posts with street capture only. There you have it. Relax.

Sandpiper said...

RE: 9:39's opinion wasn't me. Just expressing empathy to him/her for the wrath that ensued after their comment.

Most people read but don't comment. This person did but probably never again. I can see why. Unfortunate.

Anonymous said...

Sandpiper, what does your first line mean?

Anonymous said...

What does it say near that feature between the elevator and the exit from the kitchen?

Where does one enter this apartment?

Is the private landing the main entrance?

Anonymous said...

Gorgeous place. Some hedge fund fat cat will soon swoop in. And if you don't know the benefits of a windowed pooper, you've obviously never lived in any sort of apartment or co-op!

Anonymous said...

I love it when LGB's love for New York and its posh flats shows in huge comments, which are educational and illuminating.

I just wish I could understand the principles of a good floor plan fully so as to know when designing one, ordering one to be drafted, or recognizing one when seeing it.

So many people above swoon over this one, I wonder what makes if so special.

Anonymous said...

Looking at the floor plan, it seems very simple: there's a series of bedrooms with southern exposure, the dining and living rooms are on the western side, so that you can enjoy the sunset, and the pantry, kitchen, laundry, and other service spaces are on neatly put in a corner on the northern side.

Is that another terrace on the northern and eastern side?

The dotted white space?

lil' gay boy said...

Anon 12:29,

You got it in one; the private landing is indeed the main entrance -- in the era that this was built, it was (and still is) considered a plus to not have to share either the elevator (or if a dedicated one isn't available) at least the landing with no other tenants for privacy. The feature outside the kitchen is a service elevator (these are usually indicated with an "X" on floor plans to indicate a void -- the shaft -- that passes through floors, or floor to ceiling to indicate a shower, etc.).

Anon 12:37,

You're too kind!

"...the principles of a good floor plan..."

Perfectly put, as they are indeed principles, not hard & fast rules (as well as personal preferences), which is why they are flexible and change over time. A good example here is in the living room, where the fireplace is centered on the inside wall; centered for symmetry, and on the inside wall which dates back centuries to when this was the most efficient way to get the most out of its heat. Not only did it not lose heat to the outside, but hot gases warmed the stack & radiantly heated spaces above.

Some other principles:

• Bedrooms oriented toward the morning sun (south & or east), to wake one early in the day; personally I am not a morning person (more likely to wail "...it burns...it burns!" than whistle "...here comes the sun..." -- I prefer a northern or western exposure;

• The gallery serves as a circulation space, off which both public & private spaces can be accessed (one usually doesn't want a bedroom or bathroom opening directly into a living space -- privacy/neatness/sanitary reasons; nor do you want to have to cross such spaces with groceries/dirty laundry/etc., for example.

• No bathrooms opening directly into spaces where food is prepared or eaten, or where guests gather (but located discreetly & conveniently nearby);

• Doors & windows that are not only balanced/centered/symmetrical on the wall (in traditional design, not necessarily so with modern), but also balanced with such openings either opposite or adjacent in the room -- this creates a vista across & through rooms, giving a greater sense of space, rhythm & movement;

Obviously not hard & fast rules; this apartment was constructed in an age when one did not have to be über rich to have at least a maid and/or cook, when food was not prepared by your own hands, but rather behind the scenes by "others" (hence the separate service wing here). Nowadays the kitchen is usually the hearth, the center of the home, where family & guests gather with the host and do more than just prepare & eat food.

Anonymous said...

Why compels this fellow to wanker on at such length? Zzzzzz.

Anonymous said...

Correction: What compels this fellow...

Anonymous said...

How evil of you.

The guy was asked a question, and was more than generous and quite patient to dedicate a few minutes of his time to answer them.

You should be ashamed, seriously.

Thank you, LGB! Pay no attention to these attacks, there are people here who like your comments.

Anonymous said...

Ditto, Anonymous 6:09 a.m.

Rabbi Hedda LaCasa

Anonymous said...

Ditto, Anonymous 6:09 a.m.

Tom Thumb

Sandpiper said...

Ditto, Anonymous 6:09 a.m.

lil' gay boy said...

Thanks, kids; not to worry. If I can meet the world as lil' gay boy, I think my skin is thick enough for a prick or two...

;-)

Sticks & stones, sticks & stones.

Anonymous said...

Thank you so much, L, for that wonderful explanation and comment! I appreciate it very much. I am sorry that some people here do not appreciate it.

I enjoyed reading it.

I am so glad to see, too, that you do not find Senator Clark's mansion to be a hideous piece of work. True, the exterior needs much work to be toned down, and the interiors were cold, but after I read your thoughts, I found the article about it on The New York Times' website, and I think yours is partly in that vein, in that people "parrot" how hideous it was, but if it were designed by Carrère & Hastings, people would faint in awe.

I find it hard to believe that the wonderful Henri Deglane, who designed the Grand Palais in Paris, had anything to do with it, and that much was changed from his original project.

Yet, as you rightly point out, it would be quite a sight if it were still standing.

Anonymous said...

After and and that there should be a suppose, believe, or guess.

Anonymous said...

@1:43 & lgb. I'm a Clark family history nut, but clueless as to the Mansion's architectural origins. You hooked me so I poked around for like 20 minutes.

Several writings on the subject, sourced to credible experts including one from 1906, sketch out the following scenario.

Apparently Clark visited Paris a lot. He loved Deglane's ornate exposition buildings, etc. Clark told the NY architectural firm to send Deglane the finalized Mansion plans so he could "amplify embelishments". Deglane is quoted to have say he was instructed to "superintend the execution of the imported and imposed design". On the gossipy side, the NY firm was bitter about that and blew off Deglane's involvement to merely approving the plans as per Clark's request (see link). Can you imagine the goopy tension that ensued?!

The bottom line appears to be this: The mansion's frothy Beaux-Art (?) details originate from Deglane, not the NY architects. Who knows.

Deglane is also said to have designed the super-mega-expensive Clark family crypt. Again, who knows.

You'll love this link from Architectural Record, 1906. Please see page 27, right column, for Clark's directive. It's within a dedicated piece on the Mansion.

http://books.google.com/books?id=GkpTAAAAMAAJ&dq=senator%20Clark&pg=PA27#v=onepage&q=senator%20Clark&f=true

lil' gay boy said...

Thanks! I read this a long while ago & had completely forgotten about it (old Architectural Records on Google are amazing!)

For some great gossip on the house, see another of my favorite blogs here.

Marcus said...

960 Fifth is ,of course, one of the most prestigious,exclusive,expensive,best
co-ops on the UES.However, some of the unique and palatial units have been subdivided.The best unit was 10-11 A-B, a 10000 SF beast with a 58*28 feet 2 story high ballroom.Candela himself supervised the subdivision after the war.The corner duplex maisonette was also cut in two units.The QUADRUPLEX B line maisonette(a special request from a very potent buyer) was cut up a long time ago too.
There are two "typical" types of apartments-midblock duplexes about 4500 SF each and corner simplexes 5500 SF each.One of the B line duplexes has been cut too(either the 3-4 B or 7-8B,not sure).Some of the palatial apartments are still intact though.Unit 6-7 A -a unique semi-duplex owned by billionaire Gustavo Cisneros for over 2 decades has 17 foot ceilings in all the public rooms and two bedroom floors on the sidestreet;this unit is 8000 SF.The apartment above 8A (former Von Bulow place) is 5500 SF but it has also very high ceilings in the public spaces(some 14-15 feet) and normal 10 foot in bedrooms on the sidestreet.This unit is owned by a member of the Safra empire.The 12th full floor unit, 8000 SF owned for many years by Anne Bass is also magnificent.This PH is so big it takes a good deal of the roof space of the 'lesser' 3 East 77th street attached to 960.The floor plan is pretty good,except for the very long corridors.All rooms (public or private) are good sized and the terraces space is plentyful,outstanding I would say.
Except for 3-4 special intact units the rest are great but not on par with what you can find in the other Fifth Avenue grand dames.Square footage and frontage wise they are inferior to 820,834, among others.It's also a bit farther uptwon, because of its "uber-exclusive" board it hasnt witnessed huge prices like 834 or 2 East 67th street,or even 927.On the exclusivity part its 4th on the Avenue , after the older and snootier 820,998 and
4 East 66th street.
The ground floor contains a number of restaurants,lounges, a huge "laidies powder room', the super's apartment which faces the sidestreet(rather unusual feature).
The connected,lesser attached 3E 77th street is nothing impressive,originally a rental-income producing twin.
It replaced the extravagant Clark mansion and a smaller townhouse owend by Charles Dieterich at 963 Fifth midblock.
Architecturally the apartment house is relatively bland,with somewhat inconsistent fenestration .The top of the structure is elaborate though,and most striking.

lil' gay boy said...

Great info Marcus; many thanks!

Anonymous said...

9:28 AM, ha, that is what I concluded aghast after I read a few articles after writing that post.

It seems so different from his other work.

In my view, the most beautiful French-looking house in the United States is the International Temple, before known as Perry Belmont mansion, in Washington D. C. That's the kind of house New York City should have. Gorgeous.

Marcus said...

Current residents in 960 Fifth:
-Anne Bass 12 fl(lived there with Sid before divorce)
-Roy Zuckerberg 11A
-Carlos Rodriguez Pastor 11-12B
-Loic de Kertanguy 9B
-Joseph Safra 8A
-Gustavo Cisneros 6-7A
-Benjamin Steinbruch 5-6B
-Matthew Wolf 4A
-Richard Feigen 1-2B maisonette
-David Mackie 1A maisonette
-Bijan Rahmani 2A
Bijan Rahmani, who was rejected at 998 about 10 years ago before paying 15 mil to Alice Spencer in 2006

Anonymous said...

If you go to the Columbia University Libraries website, under New York Real Estate Brochure Collection. At the top is a search box, if you search 3 e. 77 St. or 960 fifth ave, you can see the original floor plans. The ones listed for the 3 e. 77 st. are not for the faint of heart. You've been warned.

Anonymous said...

Pics are up....
http://www.bhsusa.com/manhattan/upper-east-side/960-fifth-avenue/coop/9745673#

Sandpiper said...

Marcus,
Good stuff. You are an absolute wild man of knowledge. It wouldn't surprise me if you are on the board. Your secret's safe with me!

Marcus said...

Great pics of the interiors.
@Sandpiper
No I am not on the board.I do know most the residents in these buildings.Only visited one apartment back in the 1999, the 3rd floor simplex .The public rooms were beyond belief..in size and appointments.
I think the best apartment on Fifth EVER was the 10-11 A-B with the 58*28feet balroom.I rate it higher than the triplex at 834 or Leonard's duplex PH.
@Anonymus those floor plans are great, the REAL ones( from the Department of buildings) are much better though...and give the square footages too.

Anonymous said...

Why are those plans for 3 E. 77th St. not for the faint-hearted?

Marcus said...

@Anonymus the units at 3 East 77th are nowhere near the ones in 960, they were simply income producing rentals...most have a fireplace in the living room, decent layouts, and access to the Georgian Suite/lounges below. Other than that, they're typical UES 3-4 room apartments.
As for this PH, when the building opened in 1928 it was priced at, hold onto your hats, 260 000 $.A huge price for those times, but it wasn't the most expensive unit in the apartment house.That distinction was held by the special duplex 10-11 A-B, which had a 58* 28 foot two story high ballroom with loggia in the middle and a petite balcony.The second most expensive unit was the 12th, full floor(now owned by socialite Anne Bass) which was priced at 325,000$.The third most expensive was the fantastic semi-duplex 6-7 A(owned by Gustavo Cisneros now), priced at 270,000$.This PH was only the 4th most desirable apartment in the 15-16 unit building.