Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Your Mama Hears...

...from a trusted and impeccably well-connected Platinum Triangle real estate insider that the much whispered about sixty-some million dollar sale of the Singleton mansion in L.A.'s hoity-toity Holmby Hills* and the $75-85 million dollar deal (allegedly) going down for the fabled Owlwood estate nearby are not the only super-sized deals in the works in that particular and particularly posh part of Los Angeles.

Buckle yer real estate safety belts, butter beans, because Your Mama now hears that after more than eight years on and off the market wealthy divorcée Suzanne Saperstein's palatial limestone château in the Holmby Hills, dubbed Fleur de Lys and currently listed off-market as "The Most Celebrated Estate in Los Angeles" with a stomach churning $125 million price tag, is quietly in escrow for $85 million with a super-rich Chinese businessman. (Rumor and gossip, kids, rumor and gossip.)

Miz Saperstein and her Texas-based ex-husband, David Saperstein, custom built the proudly immoderate 35,000+ square foot residence that, so the stories go, was inspired by the 17th century Château Vaux-le-Vicomte, about 50 miles southeast of Paris near the commune of Melun. When it was completed in 2002 the Saps filled the hotel-sized house with 17th and 18th century antiques, some of which were sold off in an April 2012 auction that brought in more than $8 million. The Sapersteins divorced 2005 after he hooked up with their Swedish-born nanny—who is now his third wife—and haute couture collecting Second Miz Saperstein was granted ownership of the grandiloquent estate that sprawls across more than four painstakingly manicured and maintained acres.

Current digital marketing materials for the wildly ostentatious property states the nearly five acre estate has a zig-zagging tree-lined driveway nearly a half mile long that passes through a pair of pillars into a motor court almost as large as the Place Vendôme in Paris. A smaller secondary motor court provides access the estate's garages.

As per listings and previous reports, Fleur de Lys has 12 bedrooms and 15 bathrooms, a count that may or may not account for staff quarters and separate guest accommodations. There are vast formal living and dining rooms, a two-story library with hand-carved book cases, a multi-level wine cellar and tasting room, a state-of-the-art 35mm digital movie theater, and a gilt-trimmed ballroom that can accommodate upwards of 300 people. The are several kitchens on the property including a commercial grade catering kitchen capable of churning out petit fours and hors d'oeuvre for 1,000 or more party guests.

The fully landscaped grounds include flat lawn larger than a soccer pitch, extensive formal gardens, a world-class fitness facility and spa, a lighted tennis court and a swimming pool complex that includes a pool house larger than most people's entire houses.

*Although we heard from several sources the Singleton mansion, currently listed on the open market for $75 million, was in the process of being bought by Tinseltown mover and shaker Jerry Bruckheimer, we now hear that's not the case. According to Peter Propertyseller the house is actually being bought, as we were first told by Our Fairy Godmother in the Holmby Hills, by a fella from London for somewhere in the lows sixty millions. We shall see, butter beans, we shall see.

**The name that keeps popping up in relation to the much tittered about (alleged) sale of Owlwood is real estate investor Richard Weintraub and his wife Liane. The couple currently own La Villa Contenta, an extravagant, six-plus acre bluff top spread in Malibu that they first listed on the open market back in 2010 with an asking price of $75 million. The asking price has since plummeted to a still sky-high but much lower $54 million. The 12,000+ square foot main residence on 1.62 gated and landscaped acres is also listed separately from the remainder of the estate with an asking price of $23.8 million and the estate's positively Baroque onyx- and shell-encrusted natatorium is also listed separately with an asking price of $22.5 million.

listing photo: Westside Estate Agency

87 comments:

Anonymous said...

And what was the price on the Petra sale that she blew by requiring Petra pay for her moving expenses?

Anonymous said...

fler de lys was recently used in a catastrophic tv show pilot. dont rememeber the name of it :)

Anonymous said...

@10:43 - She offered $85 Million. So even if she gets the same $85 Million she's still losing money by having to pay nearly another year in carrying costs. And she's probably still going to have to pay for her own moving expenses. What kind of idiot billionaire can't pay moving expenses?

Anonymous said...

An estate like this easily cost $2m a year to pay taxes, utilities, maintain and operate. It's been two years since the Manor sale went down. So she needs to get like $90m to break even with what she would have netted selling to Petra.

Anonymous said...

Tommorow we'll hear that the Gabriel Brener house is about to be sold too?

Anonymous said...

How much did this house actually cost the owners so far? How much was the construction? If it cost $2m a year to maintin, from 2002, when it was finished, until now, that is, obviously, $24m solely for the upkeep.

Anonymous said...

I wonder if the Chinese businessman we'll be able to correct the bad feng shui of the house, especially the "arrow of death" driveway:

http://flyingstarfengshui.wordpress.com/2009/07/02/fleur-de-lys-has-bad-earth-luck/

Anonymous said...

He's just parking cash offshore. He'll probably never spend a day there.

Anonymous said...

As long as we've been talking so much about rumors and whispers of late, here's two more completely unverified pocket/whisper listing rumors: I've heard that Darren Star and Sela Ward both have their Bel Air estates available, reportedly in the high-teens->twenty million price range. Rumors & gossip, just rumors & gossip (as momma would say).

I'm not going to post links, but will tell interested parties that both houses were featured in magazines within the last 1-2 years, and both have numerous photos publish on the websites of the architects who worked on them, which experienced Googlers should be easily able to find...

Anonymous said...

Oh, now – you're going to make me Google the Darren Star house... I know where it is, but have no idea which architect worked on it.

Anonymous said...

Also, 9904 Kipp finally went pending....maybe Kimora Lee Simons really is buying that ugly house.

Anonymous said...

Darren Star's Bel Air house (Mark Rios architect):
http://www.rchstudios.com/bel-air-residence/

Sela Ward's Stone Canyon estate (Robbin Hayne architect):
http://www.haynearchitects.com/stonecanyon.html

Anonymous said...

Petra is flipping the manor for $600mm

Anonymous said...

Thank you for the Darren Star's and Sela Ward's houses.

It was an awful end-of-the-year, if I remember correctly, last year regarding this kind of sales, and now with so many of them happening at once, I wonder what will happen by the end of this year.

There is also so much construction around Bel Air and Holmby Hills...

Anonymous said...

Didn't she just sell off everything inside? Does she still live there?

Anonymous said...

Dear Mama, You should have another part of your blog for the unrelated properties that get discussed. It's too confusing. Is it secretly you who mixes these other things in here? The information sounds too professional.

Anonymous said...

I'm just guessing, but I don't think this fleur-de-lys house is going to be a tear down. This isn't a house that gives me the warm and fuzzies.

Anonymous said...

@5:46 - You're too trusting. This "unrelated" real estate takeover ain't Mama's doing. Resident chubby triangulated another way to hijack comments to feed her need.

doug-g said...

This is a tear down. My sources told me that the buyer found one of those pre-fab craftsman style houses that Sears sold in the 1920's by an abandoned railroad crossing near Clearfield, UT, still in the damned box. Everyone knows that any antique model still in the box is worth more than an assembled one, but these rich people don't worry about stuff like that. The Sears house will be put together on the lot just as soon as the present mess can be cleared off.

Anonymous said...

That's the best you can do, asshole?

Rick Wrinklebottom said...

Who is "Resident chubby"? I know I haven't been commenting around here as much as I used to, but this reference is completely escaping me.

Also, what's the big deal about someone injecting a little gossip and a few links into the conversation? Isn't real estate gossip the reason we're all here in the first place?

Anonymous said...

Anyone care to guess who is the rich Chinese?

lil' gay boy said...

Although a tad too monumental for the size of the lot, as well as a bit over-the-top, the interiors of Fleur-de-Lys still remain unique, with some very sumptuous and sybaritic details.

By attempting to faithfully reference historical designs, the grand scale of the public spaces still maintain a domestic air with the highest end materials & craftsmanship (unlike many McMansions that utilize such materials more for their "wow" factor, and how enumerating them looks in a property description blurb, than for their appropriateness in use & construction).

Still, for such a massive manse on 5 acres or so, it is a paean to wretched excess -- it's only redemption lies in the fact that, from the perspective of time & distance it appears to have been a sincere homage to the Château Vaux-le-Vicomte.

However, to attempt such an homage required much more property to properly surround such a structure with the vast gardens & vistas it needs to esthetically relate the house & grounds into a more cohesive composition. The drive is a case in point; rather than processional, it seems a rather poor attempt to utilize otherwise irreclaimable land to substitute for a more esthetic (and historically accurate) approach sequence.

And we know the feng shui is a nightmare...

;-)

Teardown? Probably not -- but the expensive materials & amenities certainly will not guarantee it.

Sandpiper said...

Zhang Xin? She's worth $3.6 billion and just bought a $26-mil NY townhouse at 45 East 74th Street.

According to the NY Post via Forbes, she's a "glamorous 48-year-old self-made billionaire CEO of Beijing's real estate firm SoHo", known for "developing office buldings in Hong Kong and Shanghai."

http://nypost.com/2013/11/06/chinese-billionaire-snaps-up-26m-east-side-mansion/

Anonymous said...

Château Vaux-le-Vicomte?

Monumental?

Doesn't it look more like a barn of a real French château from the Loire Valley, Li'l? Hm? What do you say?

To me it looks like a side building on the range of some French palace. I can't recall now which one precisely, but I'm sure I've seen a few simple cuboid hôtels particuliers and petit châteaux around.

What should be the ratio surrounding property : house area?

lil' gay boy said...

Well, our Mama mentioned the Château Vaux-le-Vicomte; the context seems to imply that this tidbit comes from the Sapersteins themselves on the inspiration for the design.

In terms of monumental, a peek at the aerial view of the property clearly shows how the mass of this house looms over the size of its neighbors.

Certainly not of the same scale as a genuine Loire Valley Château, in comparison Fleur-de-Lys does indeed resemble more of a dependency than a château -- but this is a reference to, not a replica of, the Château Vaux-le-Vicomte.

As for the surrounding property, such neoclassical architecture (aesthetically speaking) traditionally adheres to at least some of the principals of Beaux Arts landscape design (from the Cultural Landscape Foundation):

"Linked together by formal geometry within an over-all landscape design, Beaux Arts garden “rooms” were defined by linear allées and hedges, as well as by walls and neoclassical garden pavilions. Classical sculptures often served as focal points and lined the sides of long vistas. Fountains, water chains, oblong reflecting pools, and details such as arbors and seating relied upon symmetry, balance, and elegance of detail."

And from UC Berkley:

"...the beaux-arts neoclassical style provided a style for both building and site design that expressed America's "coming of age" as a great international power. Grand vistas were often a part of these designs, usually taking the axial form of roads, water features, or "tapis verts" (great expanses of lawn).

Anonymous said...

The Château Vaux-le-Vicomte reference comes from Richardson Robertson III himself, who was surprised to see people think it was inspired by Versailles. I don't know why when it seems that that is the only château people have heard of.

Anonymous said...

Any info on the buyer of Marmont Manor? I heard it's a family from NY.

http://www.theagencyre.com/for-sale/marmont-manor-sunset-strip/#

Anonymous said...

tear down?no.come on im from greece andnever seen this houses or the city that hosts them in real but i think that this kind of houses made the myth of beverly hills-bell air etc etc famous worlwide,no more mc mansions or spec houses there,other than that this house needs land a lot of land....great blog dear mama hello from greece

Anonymous said...

There are no monstrously expensive villas around Glyfada, Ekali, Psychiko, and Filothei, hm? I'm sure there are plenty of nice houses around Athens. You've probably been to Achilleion, Empress Elizabeth of Austria-Hungary's Neo-Pompeiian Corfu abode. There are plenty of palatial abodes around Greece, I'm sure.

Anonymous said...

Richardson Robertson III has another mansion that resembles Fleur de Lys. I'm not sure which came first. It is Ze've Drori's house in Beverly Park.

He has also designed Le Petit Trianon, David Adelipour's mansion across the street from Jerry Perenchio's estate.

Have you seen them, Li'l?

Anonymous said...

well since you compare fleyr which Achilleion i think that i must excuse my self from this conversation.you re right about hideous mansions in greece thats everywhere though.

Anonymous said...

I'm not comparing it.

You think Acheillio is a masterpiece?

And Fleur de Lys is nothing much architecturally, but it should stay because of the image people have about Beverly Hills?

Anonymous said...

of course not,look at us bitching about other peoples houses haha,but come on its not hidious its a nice replica of something that you would see in europe countryside france or whatever,lets not talk about that it is a 12 year old house..that if you or i stepped in tomorrow it would feel like it was built today..or maybe i think its a shame to tear down houses thats nothing wrong with them other than what people think is beautiful or ugly.excuse my english btw.

Anonymous said...

and yes my dear stranger acchilion is a masterpiece cause is the real thing it dosnt imitate its imetated.look hts history up,i dont make them on my own.again excuse my english

Anonymous said...

It's an expensively clad, rectilinear box on a big grassy lawn, in a very architecturally diverse area. The architect may have sold the Saperstein's with the historical references, but I'm not going double down. I'm not so sure this house warrants so much intellectual froth. I appreciate it though.

lil' gay boy said...

I'm familiar with Richardson Robertson III & his work; Oliver Cope is probably the only other contemporary architect whose oeuvre is in a similar vein.

But again my complaint is the choice of site for these compositions; although historically respectful, each seems to be shoehorned onto a much too small lot where the mass of the structure cannot be properly appreciated from an appropriate distance. The result gives the impression of institutionalization rather than domesticity.

It's almost as he started with a post-subdivision of an estate from the Gilded Age with its usually much more commodious acreage -- God knows there are enough of them here on Long Island that have suffered greatly by such paring down to an all-too-niggardly plot of land.

Without the sufficiently generous acreage for context, the result is, IMHO, a rather decent home that gives the (some might say unwarranted) impression of vulgarity because it overwhelms rather than impresses.

Anonymous said...

FYI, there are only 7 bedrooms in the main house. All of the others are in the staff quarters over the garages.

I question how the house has been maintained over the years. There were so many changes to the design, there are some ducting and vents that are impossible to get to. There were electrical, gas and plumbing issues from day one. Not to mention the subterainian ballroom and storage area tended to flood when it rained. Pre divorce, it took a staff of 25+ to run that house. I doubt post divorce that kind of money was spent.

Anonymous said...

Achilleion is a copy.

Boom.

I caught you.

How about that?

It was designed by an unknown Neapolitan architect Rafaele Caritto (sometimes spelt Carito), who copied the imperial residence in Crimea.

Anonymous said...

Lil', I agree completely.

About shoehorning.

I love it that you caught the convoluted driveway mess and pointed it out.

Anonymous said...

And thank you, Lil', for your posts, they are much appreciated.

1:51 PM, so is that a minus for the architect or JD Group, which built the house?

Anonymous said...

In my view, the best house around that area is on the Kern estate, designed by George Washington Smith, and now owned by The Bold and the Beautiful head writer and executive producer Bradley Bell.

Anonymous said...

JD Group was the contractor.

The Swan said...

Fleur d' Lys...I recall quite clearly began with a series of purchases of surrounding homes in the 90s, demolition of said homes - the compilation of a what WE term a Grand Estate size lot in TODAYS world of the Westside of Los Angeles proper. The rooms are no more gaudy than MARBLEHOUSE, THE ELMS OR ROSECLIFF of Newport RI or the grounds any less significant in stature of plantings than the aforementioned LEGENDARY ESTATES...while we are at it, let's toss in THE BREAKERS for large house on a small lot ratio!
Ms. Saperstein may not be Mrs. Astor, who was NOT Blueblooded at birth nor THE Mrs. BLoomingdale who was the daughter of a dentist last I heard, but she DOES HAVE STYLE AND TASTE and money..to have placed her vision across the street from the legendary estate of Jack Warner now owned by David Geffen, and around the corner from the most triumphant GREENACRES, The Harold Lloyd estate.

Anonymous said...

The Boom. I caught you. How about that? commenter is wrong and owes our kind sibling from Greece an big apology. You were unnecessarily cocky, mean spirited and did I already say ... WRONG?

Yes, these two Greece mansions/palaces are Neo-Renaissance. However, architectural periods have cumulatively combined since 3500-plus BCE. Neo-Renaissance is just another layer within the big picture of architectural evolution.

Neo-Renaissance residences across the world (not only in Greece) share the nuances of these two heatedly discusses properties. Neither were the first or last.

Anonymous said...

Russian, whatever.

Anonymous said...

@10:31 from Greece. The person who commented that this was a "tear down" and going to be replace with a historic craftsmen bungalow was being sarcastic. Many foreigners who only learned English as a second language do not understand sarcasm. So to clarify it for you, they were "joking" when referring to it as a "tear down"

Anonymous said...

*grabbing the popcorn* -- mr. smiley

Anonymous said...

Here are some house-to-land ratios of some of L.A.'s finest historic estates, along with their architects. These showplaces were built during a time when land was the actual qualifier of wealth, power and prestige; not how much house one could squeeze onto a lot. * denotes properties that are either no longer in existence or whose lots have been subdivided from original acreage.
-Cordhaven, Paul R. Williams: 32,000 sqft/ 8 acres (1932)*
-Greystone, Gordon Kaufmann: 46,046 sqft/ 19.5 acres (1928)
-Casa Encantada, James Dolena: 20,725/ 6.11 acres (1938)
-The Knoll, Roland Coate: 25,437 sqft/ 10.19 acres (1955)
-Beverly House, Gordon Kaufmann: 20,570 sqft/ 16.5 acres (1926)*
-Greenacres, Sumner Hunt: 23,114 sqft/ 22 acres (1928)*
-Warner Estate, James Dolena: 13,612 sqft/ 9 acres (1937)
-Pickfair, Wallace Neff: 13,421 sqft/ 18 acres (1911/1934)*
-Jay Paley residence, Paul R. Williams: 15,011 sqft/ 5.6 acres (1934)*

Anonymous said...

^^^ Oops! Beverly House should have 6.5 Acres, not 16.5.

Anonymous said...

These aren't ratios, they're just interior s.f. and land.

Here's a ratio.

Using your first property as an example, the ratio would be 1:10.89.
For every one square foot of interior there's 10.89 square feet of land.

That's what talks.

Anonymous said...

What do the asterisks represent?

Anonymous said...

Nevermind, I see it above but was looking below. Sorry.

Anonymous said...

No, I'm not wrong. Achilleion is modelled after the Crimean imperial residence. Architectural history books say it clearly, and the buildings say it themselves. Nothing Neo-Renaissance about it, but a lot is Neo-Pompeiian.

Anonymous said...

So the JD Group contracted the wrong people who made a mess of the ventilation ducts?

That's what I'm saying.

You're buying a $85,000,000 mansion with infested ducts? Wow. I hope the one who is buying know what he or she she doing.

In the Shooting LA aerial it really looks worn out:

http://www.shootingla.com/#/aerials/

It is supposed to be a newer photo from the one above.

Sandpiper said...

Yes. You are wrong, H. I've paid enough tuition to know this topic and the bigger picture without the crutch of Google. Not saying I know everything about everything, but I did know this.


Anonymous said...

Oh, Sandy, who is H?

LMAO.

You're wrong.

And you might've wasted your tuition.

MarkyMark said...

I've visited Vaux-le-Vicomte, and this joint doesn't remind me of it - AT ALL. Vaux is big fun - I even got up into the turret - and at the time you could rent golf carts and go zipping around the (very extensive) grounds; too bad you can't do that at Versailles!

dimitris said...

all started when i comented: tear down?no.come on im from greece andnever seen this houses or the city that hosts them in real but i think that this kind of houses made the myth of beverly hills-bell air etc etc famous worlwide,no more mc mansions or spec houses there,other than that this house needs land a lot of land....great blog dear mama hello from greece. and you responded as that:

February 20, 2014 at 10:31 AM
Anonymous Anonymous said...

There are no monstrously expensive villas around Glyfada, Ekali, Psychiko, and Filothei, hm? I'm sure there are plenty of nice houses around Athens. You've probably been to Achilleion, Empress Elizabeth of Austria-Hungary's Neo-Pompeiian Corfu abode. There are plenty of palatial abodes around Greece, I'm sure.

February 20, 2014 at 11:19 AM to end this yes my friend we too here have monstrous mansions not the size and magnitude of fleyr or smaller tbh mansions that u have in LA.when i say achilion is a masterpiece,it was not ocupied/bulit by greeks, it is cause here in greece we dont have that many palatial abodes as you think acchilion(year built 1888)and 2-3 palaces build 100 +years ago.of course we have estates built since the 1900 till now but not even close to be palatial 1-2 maybe in all greece and i doubt that.as far as it concerns fleyr...you just dont like it..but thats a matter of opinion.have a nice day.

Anonymous said...

The posts ended up on Curbed and Curbed LA:

http://curbed.com/archives/2014/02/20/touring-the-four-mega-palaces-that-may-have-just-been-sold.php

http://la.curbed.com/archives/2014/02/3_of_los_angeless_most_expensive_estates_may_have_all_just_sold.php

Candy Spelling said...

Dear children, while these expensive deals are certainly something to marvel at, let us not forget that the sale of the Manor puts all of them to shame. Not only did the deal close at $85 million cash (I doubt Owlwood or Suzie's places will close that high), but it also sold during the height of the recession. This is truly a testament to the firmly cemented status the Manor holds as THE most important estate ever created in Los Angeles. Aaron would be so proud, if he were here today.

lil' gay boy said...

Anon 1:57:

Thanks! Although I guess most would characterize it as self-aggrandizing bloviation...

;-)

Confidential to the size queens;

Many Newport "cottages" did indeed follow Beaux Arts principals (on the heels of earlier Colonial & Shingle Style periods) -- yet almost all of the most familiar ones such as The Breakers (replacing an earlier Shingle Style home that burned), Marble House (a rather pricey birthday present), The Elmsand Rosecliff are indeed on smaller than usual sites for Beaux Arts-style estates; but in each case they have at least one unobstructed axial view of the sea, and a more generous buffer on the sides, if not the main façade, of the structure. (BTW, my dear Swan, I choose to characterize the interiors as "lavish" when done well, "elaborate" when they somehow miss the mark).

;-)

Of the most celebrated CA estates that are on smaller parcels, the sites in question invariably have at least one vista that is uninterrupted (promontory, city or at the least, treetop views); most, although significant architectural endeavors, I would not characterize as in the Beaux Arts vein.

It seems to be an unfortunate occurrence that the work of Richardson Robertson III (whose Beaux Arts attempts are indeed admirable) always seem to find themselves perched on narrow, less-than-generous lots with little or no view.

Anonymous said...

Tower Grove

Esther Shapiro said...

Amen Sweet Candy. You sing it sistah!!! Nothing comes close to the Manor.

Anonymous said...

I was surprised to find out that even Wallace Neff designed in the Beaux-Arts vein! The house in question can be found at 105 North Rossmore Avenue. It is a Neoclassical mansion resembling a Grecian temple.

I think the most beautiful Beaux-Arts house in Los Angeles is the one designed by a Frenchman. Naturally. It is the Sunset House.

The owners made a mess of the landscaping, though...

The Swan said...

Rossmore is an exact copy of The PAVILION DE MUSIQUE at LOUVECIENNES commissioned by Madame Dubarry by the Chandler family. Their son overseeing all aspects of its design. Neff never really warmed to it as it broke the unspoken Architects Golden Rule - you NEVER copy! For those who aren't familiar, Neff never graduated formally as an architect, but did travel extensively studying...his family fortune was Rand McNally. A TRUE Gentlemens' Architect.

Anonymous said...

I was surprised to see Wallace Neff design a Grecian Neoclassical edifice. It is all much clearer now, The Swan.

What did you think of his Joan Bennett/Eugene Allen/Henry Earl Singleton house we were discussing on the previous page?

The Swan said...

Elegance of a bygone era...when sweeping staircases and oval entry's were de rigueur, chinoiserie wallpaper, and craftsmanship to withstand earthquakes. Entry is a copy of Bennett house on Mapleton.

Rosco Mare said...

The Joan Bennett has been gutted at least twice. Once by the corporate head of an airline about 15 years ago. I'm glad it has survived because it has alot of charm in addition to its beauty and Hollywood provenance.

Fun fact: the mailbox is a copy of the main house.

Anonymous said...

Ha-ha! You can see it on ! Thank you, Rosco Mare.

The Swan, what do you mean by his family fortune was Rand McNally?

Sandpiper said...

This is 4:39/Sandpiper...

Re 4:59 comment...

It's an interpretation of Neo-Classical architecture, not Neo-Renaissance. Picked up the wrong term from sidebar on my notes. Neo-Renaissance.

Honest enough to clarify that.

The comment string became too volatile and unkind at times to use known name.

Anonymous said...

You can see it on Street View, that is what I omitted somehow above regarding the post box.

Anonymous said...

@2:49 Wallace Neff's grandfather was the McNally in the Rand McNally corporation.

Josh Boyaner said...

It just goes to show that you too can live like this if you know how to rip off countless people selling them garbage mortgages and then selling them short. God Bless America!

Anonymous said...

get your facts straight Josh Boyaner

Anonymous said...

I wonder where the Rabbi is.

He should comment on the French architecture of Fleur de Lys.

I'd love to hear it.

Anonymous said...

The Rabbi is female, you doofus.

Anonymous said...

hijackoff rabbi la_boring stay gone

Anonymous said...

I don't care what he or she is.

Anonymous said...

"It" = rabbi/ intersex.

Anonymous said...

Sandpiper your strange beef with the Rabbi is tiresome and annoying. It's you that's dragging the commentary down with your incessant nagging about him (or her or whatever) and not the other way around as you'd like all of us to belive. Kindly keep you feckless criticisms of the rabbi to your yourself.

Anonymous said...

Hey crazy Hedda up there hiding as 4:15.

Give it a rest and stop trying to drag Sandpiper down to your level. You're no match.

Anonymous said...

Is that you Sandpiper?? Pathetic that you create so many anons just because of your strange jealousy of Rabbi...

Sandpiper said...

Nope. Wasn't me.

William D. said...

Dear 6:45, Sorry to burst your bubble but I'm 4:15 and I'm not the Rabbi. I'm just someone who reads this blog and the commentary on a regular basis and who thinks it's annoying and ironic that Sandpiper constantly dogs Rabbi for his/her pontifications when his/her own commentary is often no less pontifical. I enjoy both the Rabbi's and Sandpiper's comments about the various properties Mama writes about and think they both have interesting and thoughtful things to say but the one-sided wrath Sandpiper has for Rabbi is bizarre and unnecessary since I can't even remember a time where Rabbi made any sort of disparaging comment about Sandpiper.

Anonymous said...

4:15 8:52 11:34 ANON HEDDA.
STOP FUCKING WITH SANDPIPER YOU ARROGANT BORE.

Anonymous said...

How fucking sad is Sandpiper, that he has to create all these anons to cover his own insecurity and bash a funny and harmless poster like Rabbi.